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In Scandinavian languages, adjectives (both attributive and predicative) are rejected based on gender, number, and the determination of the noun they change. In Icelandic and faroe islands, unlike other Scandinavian languages, adjectives are also rejected in the grammatical case. Adjectives correspond to gender and number with nouns that modify them in French. As with verbs, chords are sometimes displayed only in spelling, because forms written with different formulas are sometimes pronounced in the same way (z.B. pretty, pretty); although, in many cases, the final consonant is pronounced in feminine forms, but mute in masculine forms (for example. B Small vs. Small). Most plural forms end on -s, but this consonant is pronounced only in connecting contexts, and these are determinants that help to understand whether the singular or plural is targeted. In some cases, verb participations correspond to the subject or object. The second of these strategies, although repeated, has the example that the adjective describes both nouns (while if you say a white shirt and pants, it sounds identical to the ear to a white shirt and pants – a white shirt and pants). In our introduction to the form of French adjectives, we mentioned that, for example, an -e is normally added in the spelling of an adjective in both the feminine and plural. But we didn`t work too much on how to decide if you need the feminine and/or plural form of the adjective: we simply assumed that the adjective would be used next to a specific topic and that the gender and number of adjectives would match that single subnose.

In the case of verbs, gender conformity is less prevalent, although it may still occur. For example, in the past French compound, in certain circumstances, the past part corresponds to the subject or an object (see past compound for details). In Russian and most other Slavic languages, the form of the past in sex corresponds to the subject. If all related nouns have the same sex, then the sex of the adjective follows that of nouns (so at the top white is feminine because there are both shirts and ties). . . .